Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey Retiring in 2022

Meghann Showers

Alex Wong/Getty Images Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA) said Monday he plans to retire from the Senate in 2022. “My family and I have reached a decision, and I wanted to share that with the people of Pennsylvania, and that is that I will not be running for reelection in 2022, […]

Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA) said Monday he plans to retire from the Senate in 2022.

“My family and I have reached a decision, and I wanted to share that with the people of Pennsylvania, and that is that I will not be running for reelection in 2022, and I will not be running for governor,” Toomey said in a press conference.

“I will serve out the remainder of my term for a little over two years that are left to the current term, and after that my plan is to go back to the private sector,” he added. “I want to say very clearly that representing the people of Pennsylvania, this big, beautiful, complicated, diverse state, has been an extraordinary, amazing honor — it still is — and it’s been by far the highlight of my professional life.”

Toomey explained that the “reasons that I’ve reached this decision are not political, they’re personal,” and noted that “by the time I’ve finished this term I will have been in public office for eighteen years.”

“Eighteen years is a long time, and all of that time our family has lived in Pennsylvania. That was the right decision for our family, and I’ve spent as little time as I can in Washington, coming back home as quickly as I can after the end of official business, but it still ends up being a lot of time. A lot of time away from home,” he said. “And I’m looking forward to more time back at home.”

Toomey has served as senator since the 2010 elections.

The Philadelphia Inquirer noted that Toomey’s retirement could have “significant implications for the state’s next elections.”

“As the only Republican holding statewide office other than judges, Toomey was widely seen as the likely Republican favorite for governor in 2022,” the Inquirer explained. “His decision not to run for that office or for Senate could create two wide-open contests on the Republican side, while depriving the party of running its most established current political figure in Pennsylvania.”

“It will also open a prime Senate target for national Democrats, regardless of who controls the chamber after this year’s election,” they added.

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