Why learning a second language is good for your brain

Rose Blan

People study a second language for many reasons; to advance their careers, expand their cultural horizons, and make travelling more enjoyable, etc. However, what you may not know is learning a second language has numerous cognitive benefits too. In this blog post, we will be discussing why learning a new […]

People study a second language for many reasons; to advance their careers, expand their cultural horizons, and make travelling more enjoyable, etc. However, what you may not know is learning a second language has numerous cognitive benefits too. In this blog post, we will be discussing why learning a new language is good for your brain.

It sharpens your cognitive abilities

Just as your muscles weaken once you stop exercising them, the brain weakens once you stop learning. Your neuro connections weaken, causing forgetfulness and even dementia. The process of understanding a new language is one of the hardest things your brain can do, making it the most effective way to keep your mind sharp.

It promotes creativity

Learning and speaking a new language is a creative act in itself, and that creativity often translates to other areas of your life. As you may have already observed, your creative output is dependent on your creative input. Therefore, the more diverse stimuli you expose your brain to, the more likely you are to come up with great innovative ideas. Also, having a richer vocabulary helps you see the world with a fresh perspective giving you a new understanding of phenomena.

Strengthens your decision making

Decisions made in your second language are more purpose-driven than those made in your native language. When you make decisions in your second language, you distance yourself from your mother tongue’s biases and emotional responses, which results in better, clear-headed decisions.

Improves thinking skills and memory abilities

Learning a second language can help students concentrate better in class and ignore distractions more effectively. Since the language centres in the brain are very flexible, studying a second language can develop new areas of your brain and strengthen its natural ability to focus.

If you would like to learn a new language, contact one of our account managers to discuss how we can help you.

Author name – Graham Beeson

Bio – Graham is a prolific writer on all things language learning.  When Graham is not busy exploring the fascinating world of neuroscience and language learning, he spends his time playing golf in the Irish countryside!

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